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Mexico Adoptive Families

Living in Mexico adopting in Mexico


We are born Americans with a legal resident status in Mexico.  We want to adopt a local child and DIF has said we can work directly with them.  So is it okay to NOT use an agency?  What will the U.S. require of us to make the child a citizen?  Can we fill out the i-800a from Mexico?

Replies

It should be okay to not use an agency, but I really recommend that you get a lawyer (a Mexican adoption lawyer).  I would contact the US embassy in Mexico City about the US requirements.

I’m curious about where you are living?  My husband and I are Americans residing in Guadalajara, and we adopted our son here. I don’t think there are private messages on this site?

Posted by dragoncita on Sep 15, 2014 at 2:41pm

I’m so new to this process. Why would I need a adoption lawyer?  Yes, I think your advice is right that I will have to contact the embassy.

Posted by andyjessiec on Sep 15, 2014 at 2:50pm

dragoncita, you can do private messages by clicking on the person’s user name to get to their profile.

From there you have the option to send a private message.

Posted by toinfinityandbiond on Sep 15, 2014 at 9:08pm

I am a mexican adoptive mother living in méxico city. I could put you in contact with an adoption lawyer and civil asociation that could help you
AND would love to have contact with you guys. If you are up to it send me a private message
best of luck!

Posted by drayn on Sep 16, 2014 at 11:47pm

1.  Remember that Mexico and the U.S. have both ratified the Hague Convention on international adoption.  This means that American citizens will need to go through a U.S. agency that is licensed in a particular state, Hague-accredited by the U.S. State Department, and approved by the Mexican government.  They will also need to follow the I-800 (Hague) adoption/immigration process if they want to get an adoption visa, so that the child can enter the U.S. as a legal permanent resident immediately after adoption. If they use Mexico’s domestic process, the child will not qualify for an adoption visa to enter the U.S.

2.  Because you live overseas, even though you are U.S. citizens, your child will not qualify for automatic citizenship under the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.  However, if you either follow the I-800 process or have had the child in your legal and physical custody for two years, you CAN apply for expedited naturalization.  Basically, you can arrange with the USCIS for expedited naturalization, and then apply at the U.S. Embassy in Mexico for a tourist visa for your child, specifically for going to the U.S. to complete the expedited naturalization.  This approach is good if you plan to stay in Mexico except for that short trip, and it is easier and cheaper than the only other option.  Otherwise, the only way to get citizenship for your child would be to file the I-130 with the USCIS, but only AFTER having lived with the child in your physical and legal custody for two years; this would entitle him/her to an IR-2 visa and a green card, and you would have to naturalize him/her via the regular method in the U.S.  This would be the route to use if you plan to return to the U.S. permanently, once your child has been with you for two years.

Sharon

Posted by sak9645 on Aug 12, 2015 at 4:33am

Another quick addition to my post, above:

Yes, you can file the I-800A while living in Mexico.  Just download the form and instructions from the USCIS website and send them in with the requested documents and the fee.

Remember, however, that you will have to submit it with your completed homestudy report, as well as other documents.  If you have not yet had a homestudy, do that first, as it can take a month or two or more. 

Your Hague accredited placement agency may be able to recommend a homestudy provider who will work with you in Mexico.  If not, the U.S. Embassy in Mexico may keep a list of acceptable homestudy providers.

Remember that, while the homestudy provider must approve your home in Mexico as suitable for raising a child, a homestudy is about much more than your home.  It must determine that you do not have any barriers to being approved as adoptive parents.  But just as importantly, it is designed to prepare you for the special challenges of parenting an adopted child.

Once you have had your homestudy and filed the I-800A, your placement agency will lead you through the steps of preparing a dossier for the Mexican government.  Make sure that your placement agency is licensed in at least one U.S. state, has current Hague accreditation, and has extensive experience in Mexican adoptions.

Sharon

Posted by sak9645 on Sep 22, 2015 at 4:00am

Actually, if you use the Mexican domestic process, and do not go through the Hague process required by the U.S. and Mexico, your child “may” be able to get a regular dependent visa for him/her after two years. However, be advised that some Hague compliant countries will not give a passport to a child adopted by Americans living in those countries, because they were not adopted according to Hague regulations and they will view it as an attempt to circumvent Hague regulations.  Without a passport, a child cannot get a visa to enter the U.S., even after the two years required by the U.S.  Check with the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City before deciding to go the domestic route.  You are much safer following the Hague process.

Posted by sak9645 on Jan 02, 2016 at 5:16am

Actually, if you use the Mexican domestic process, and do not go through the Hague process required by the U.S. and Mexico, your child “may” be able to get a regular dependent visa for him/her after two years. However, be advised that some Hague compliant countries will not give a passport to a child adopted by Americans living in those countries, because they were not adopted according to Hague regulations and they will view it as an attempt to circumvent Hague regulations.  Without a passport, a child cannot get a visa to enter the U.S., even after the two years required by the U.S.  Check with the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City before deciding to go the domestic route.  You are much safer following the Hague process.

Posted by sak9645 on Jan 02, 2016 at 5:16am

Hello. 
I am a little late in this conversation, but hopefully some of you are still active.

I am a US citizen and resident of Mexico.  I would like to adopt a Mexican child and live in Mexico.  Can you refer me to any contacts, lawyers, phone numbers, etc to get me started?

It is such a daunting process, but I so want to be a mother.  If any of you can help, let me know.

Posted by Kerrisita on Jan 01, 2018 at 6:37pm

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