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I have been contacted from someone in Ghana that reads this forums. He said he owns an orphanage. The phone number comes up as a http://www.needychildrens.web but when I try to goggle that the site will not open. He has sent me shot records and some pics of kids. How do I know if he is for real?

Replies

My guess… he isn’t.

For one thing, international adoption needs to be done through the proper channels and needs to involve an agency, both for your protection and the children of that country. Otherwise there is a very real risk that you will either be scammed and/or deal with a child trafficker.

For another thing, in May of 2013 the following statement was made (found this on several adoption pages that had a Ghana program):

  The Government of Ghana has temporarily suspended processing of all adoption cases, including intercountry adoptions, pending Ghana’s review of its current adoption procedures. The U.S. Embassy in Accra is seeking further clarification of the scope and duration of this temporary suspension by the Government of Ghana and how this suspension may effect pending adoptions. The U.S. Embassy will continue processing adoption cases already approved by Ghanaian authorities. The Department of State will continue providing updated information on adoption.state.gov as it becomes available. If you have any questions about this notice, please contact the Office of Children’s Issues at 1-888-407-4747 within the United States, or 202-501-4444 from outside the United States. Email inquiries may be directed to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Posted by toinfinityandbiond on Sep 09, 2014 at 1:31pm

My understanding is that only the Ghanaian Department of Social Welfare can refer a child to you and process your adoption.  If you want to determine whether that agency works with the person who contacted you, by all means ask the Ghanaian Department of Social Welfare.  While Ghana has not ratified the Hague Convention, there is a clear process that has to be followed.  Also, although using an adoption agency is not currently required, be aware that Ghana is beginning to register foreign agencies to work in the country and may move in the direction of requiring use of one of them.

Sharon

Posted by sak9645 on Sep 24, 2015 at 2:57pm

Let me also add that the number of adoption scams coming out of African countries these days is mind-boggling.  Most recently, I’ve seen adoption scams coming out of Cameroon, but be wary of any communications from individuals in ANY African country, at this time, regarding children to be adopted. 

Sadly, many of the scams play upon not only prospective parents’ desires for a child, but upon their religious beliefs.  As an example, the scammers may purport to be Christians, running an orphanage based on Christian principles; they may use a lot of references to Jesus, and wish God’s blessings upon you.  Unfortunately, the only deity these scammers seem to worship is Money. 

Some of the scams seem to be masterminded by the same folks who bring you other scams, like the ones that say that someone has died and left you several million dollars, and that if you send $100 or so, by Western Union, for the legal fees to get the bank to release the funds, the several million dollars will be forwarded to you. If you fall for that one, you’ll lose the money you send, and not get anything in return.

Remember that every country has laws to protect its most vulnerable citizens, including children.  Before responding to any solicitations, go to the website of the U.S. State Department, and read the laws of the country from which the email you got was sent.  Most often, you will find that there’s no way that you can adopt legally from that country, by doing what the author of the email suggests.

Your best bet, when adopting from a country, is to become thoroughly familiar with its adoption laws, as well as with U.S. laws governing immigrating an adopted child to the U.S.  That way, you can prevent yourself from falling for scams—AND you can avoid using even U.S. based agencies and facilitators that may mislead you with regard to how quickly you can adopt, how much an adoption will cost you, and so on.

Adoption is one of the most important decisions you will make in your life.  So go about it in a legal, ethical, and well-informed way.  Don’t deal with strangers who contact you, out of the blue, on the Internet.

Sharon

Posted by sak9645 on Oct 15, 2015 at 1:05am

Let me also add that the number of adoption scams coming out of African countries these days is mind-boggling.  Most recently, I’ve seen adoption scams coming out of Cameroon, but be wary of any communications from individuals in ANY African country, at this time, regarding children to be adopted. 

Sadly, many of the scams play upon not only prospective parents’ desires for a child, but upon their religious beliefs.  As an example, the scammers may purport to be Christians, running an orphanage based on Christian principles; they may use a lot of references to Jesus, and wish God’s blessings upon you.  Unfortunately, the only deity these scammers seem to worship is Money. 

Some of the scams seem to be masterminded by the same folks who bring you other scams, like the ones that say that someone has died and left you several million dollars, and that if you send $100 or so, by Western Union, for the legal fees to get the bank to release the funds, the several million dollars will be forwarded to you. If you fall for that one, you’ll lose the money you send, and not get anything in return.

Remember that every country has laws to protect its most vulnerable citizens, including children.  Before responding to any solicitations, go to the website of the U.S. State Department, and read the laws of the country from which the email you got was sent.  Most often, you will find that there’s no way that you can adopt legally from that country, by doing what the author of the email suggests.

Your best bet, when adopting from a country, is to become thoroughly familiar with its adoption laws, as well as with U.S. laws governing immigrating an adopted child to the U.S.  That way, you can prevent yourself from falling for scams—AND you can avoid using even U.S. based agencies and facilitators that may mislead you with regard to how quickly you can adopt, how much an adoption will cost you, and so on.

Adoption is one of the most important decisions you will make in your life.  So go about it in a legal, ethical, and well-informed way.  Don’t deal with strangers who contact you, out of the blue, on the Internet.

Sharon

Posted by sak9645 on Oct 15, 2015 at 1:10am

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