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I need help
Posted: 12 January 2010 02:30 AM   Ignore ]  
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Does anyone know where I can find: Price Restrictions/ requirements etc for adopting from any country???

Posted: 25 June 2010 12:34 PM   Ignore ]  
Total Posts:  6
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http://www.spence-chapin.org/adoption-programs/b3c_fees.php

Posted: 31 December 2011 02:34 PM   Ignore ]  
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Thank you for information i need it too.

dietos

Posted: 16 September 2015 04:05 PM   Ignore ]  
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I know, the post is old, but I would like to share a source of info. Its actually a agency address from where I get some real help. You can contact them here http://giftoflifeadoptions.com/ to know all official procedure for adoption within the US and also from the other countries. I got hep from them to adopt a kid from Kenya.

Posted: 15 June 2016 06:06 AM   Ignore ]  
Total Posts:  2
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Buy false/Real Passports,Driver’s License,(.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))ID Cards,Visas, USA Green Card,Citizenship Buy Real EU/USA/UK/Canadian Passports,Driver’s License,ID

Posted: 15 June 2016 05:30 PM   Ignore ]  
Total Posts:  1
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The most authoritative information on international adoption for American citizens can be found on the website of the U.S. State Department.  Just go to adoption.state.gov.  When you get there, scroll down to “Learn About a Country” on the right side of the page, and click on the drop-down box.  You will see a list of countries.  Select one that interests you and click “Go.”  When you get to that page, scroll down to a box in the middle of the page, that is labeled “Expand All”, and click on it.  You will see information such as rules for who may adopt from that country, what sorts of children are available (age, health status), whether you must use the Hague process or the non-Hague process for the adoption, some idea of the process, and some idea of the timing and costs.

Once you have found a couple of countries that interest you, begin looking for U.S. agencies that work in those countries.  Each agency tends to work only in a limited number of countries. Be aware that the Universal Accreditation Act requires all prospective parents to use a Hague-compliant American placement agency as primary provider, even if a person does some steps in the adoption process on his/her own.  Be sure to check out an agency thoroughly, to be sure that it is experienced and ethical, using sources such as state licensing agencies, the Better Business Bureau, the U.S. embassy abroad, and—especially—references from people who have used it in the recent past.  And even if an agency is experienced and ethical, be sure to determine whether it is right for you.  As an example, if you have never traveled overseas before, and are nervous about the prospect, you’re going to want an agency that has great overseas staff to “hold your hand” every step of the way, and if you are intimidated by the amount of paperwork that is involved, you may want an agency that can do some of the steps in the process for you (often for an additional fee).  Remember that adoption is one of the most important things you will do in your life, and that the agency will be the “stork” that helps you become a parent; so choose your agency with the greatest of care

Do remember that not all countries allow Western-style adoption.  Also remember that you will not be able to adopt from most English-speaking or Western European countries, because they simply don’t have enough young and relatively healthy children to accommodate their own citizens who want to adopt; most Americans adopt from countries in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, or Latin America.  And remember, as well, that it is impossible to adopt from a country immediately after it has had a natural disaster, such as an earthquake or tsunami, or a manmade disaster, such as a civil war. Adoption is a legal process that can occur only when it can be accurately determined that a child is an orphan or legally relinquished, when official documents such as proof of birth or relinquishment can be obtained, and when courts are functioning to process adoptions.

It is also important to remember that international adoption consists of two separate process—adoption and immigration.  Even if you complete an adoption overseas, you may not be able to get an adoption visa that allows the child to enter the U.S., if the child does not meet certain requirements and the adoption does not conform to U.S. and foreign laws.  As an example, even if you want to adopt a relative’s child, you won’t be able to do so unless the child meets the U.S. definition of an “eligible orphan” and is under age 16.  And if you use the domestic process available in a country, instead of the international adoption process, you will not be able to bring the child home even if you have an adoption decree.

Sharon

 
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